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Close Ups

16th September 2022

With the naked eye, it’s often difficult or impossible to see the detail of smaller objects.
Most modern cameras and cellphones have lenses that can focus close enough to capture some of this detail.

When shooting up close I try to have good lighting, careful focus and a steady hand (or better yet a tripod) to keep the images as in focus as possible.

Below are some of the pictures that I’ve been able to photograph up close without using any special camera equipment.
 
 


 
Whatever type of camera that you’re using you’re probably equipped to take close ups. It not only interesting to see your subjects up close with lots of detail, it’s fun too.
 
 
Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 

Stay Focused Guides

01st January 2021

 
We’ve published books since 1978. However in 2012 we ceased our publishing activities to concentrate on picture-taking. Still, you may be interested in any of our previously published books about photography including these seven “Stay Focused Guides” for popular DSLR cameras.

Now we’re giving them away free to anyone who would like a copy. They are older but many of the techniques apply to most all DSLR or even the newer mirrorless cameras.

Although each title pertains to a specific model camera, most of the techniques apply to any advanced camera regardless of the make. So if you have a different model, download a PDF copy and follow along. I’m confident that you’ll pick up a few tips along the way.

And while you’re at it, why not Subscribe to our Newsletter! – to your right? We need only your name and email address.

Without further ado, here are the links for your free PDF copy of our Stay Focused Guides. Click on one of the links below to view a PDF version of a book. Then save the PDF to your desktop.

SFG for Canon XS in PDF format

SFG for Canon XSi in PDF format

SFG for Canon T2i in PDF format

SFG for Nikon D40 in PDF format

SFG for Nikon D60 in PDF format

SFG for Nikon D3000 in PDF format

SFG for Nikon D5000 in PDF format

We also have several other books that you may be interested in also available FREE:

28 Tips for Better Photographs in PDF format

National Parks – a tour in PDF format

Low Light Photography

30th March 2019

It’s Dark Down There


Mammoth Cave National Park, located in central Kentucky is the world’s largest system of caves extending more than 400 miles. On a recent trip with a few of our grandkids, we stopped there for a few hours to explore some of the caves.


here are the grandkids adorning the park sign

at this entrance way we had to descend about 30 steps

We arrived at the park too late to reserve a spot on one of the various guided tours. Instead we opted to take the self-guided tour.


The beginning of the cave entrance is lighted by daylight with handrails and a cement walkway. Continue walking and the outdoor light slowly disappears.

Electrical lights provide the only illumination inside, but they are relatively dim. We were surprised by the width of the cave at this point – about 30 feet side to side.


As you can see, we’re walking alongside the cave walls. The pathway is mostly hard dirt but there are cement pavers in some parts of this cave.

At this point, the cave widens considerably and the ceiling varies between 30 and 50 feet high. You’ll also notice that this area is well lighted.


One of the park rangers points out this small bat hanging from one of the cave walls. He tells us that there were hundreds of the bats at one time but they are no longer found in large numbers.

This part of Mammoth ends after about one-quarter of a mile. As we turn around and walk back towards the entrance way you can visualize the darkness of these caves.


This short clip shows the large size of the so-called “ampitheater” within the self-guided tour cave.



The steps from the cave. The self-guided tour is an easy way to explore Mammoth when you’re time limited.

Here is the wife and grandkids relaxing after their cave diving experience.



For those interested, these photos were taken with a Sony A7 III camera using a 24-240mm lens. In most cases, the ISO setting was 16000 or 32000 and taken handheld with a shutter speed of 1/15 or 1/30 and aperture as wide as f/3.5. I think the photos are of pretty decent quality considering the cave environment.

 

 



 

 

 

 

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