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For Movies on the Move

For several years now, GoPro has demonstrated the overwhelming popularity of action videos. They have built an empire of a business around its brand.

Sony’s HDR-AS100V and newer, yet slightly smaller HDR-AZ1 cameras are the center of their video system for recording action in the field. Both units pack lots of features into a very compact space: 1080p with image stabilization, stereo sound, high speed recording, 170-degree view, interval recoding, and WiFi and NFC equipped and GPS (AS100V only).

They are ruggedized and are waterproof, shockproof, dustproof and freezeproof without having to purchase additional accessories.

This AZ1 which is 2/3 the size of the AS100V, is mounted on a drone. Using an optional Live-View Remote (RM-LVR2V) which straps to your wrist you can control the AZ1, change settings and view the playback from afar.

The included Action Cam Movie Creator software lets edit your footage into complete, quality movies using the special recording features e.g. high speed recording, merging multiple clips into a single clip, etc.

 
 
There are a whole host of accessories for the Action Cam system including various camera mounts and straps for bicycling, surfing, boating, diving, snow sports and skateboarding.

List price for AS100V is $279 and for the AZ1 is $249. For more information, see the Sony ActionCam webpage.
 
 
Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 


 
 

Corning’s Gorilla Glass Photos

As I was browsing the aisles, I came across a booth with a display of many brilliant photos. I learned that all of these photos were printed directly on glass.

Most people recognize the Corning brand. What they may not know is that Corning is the maker of Gorilla Glass. It’s the strong, scratch-resistant surface has made it the standard fare for an overwhelming number of mobile phones.

Corning rep Katie Greene showed me this photo (of a gorilla, no less) and explained the multi-step process of turning an image into a Masterpix photo.

First a primer is printed on the back of the glass. Next the image is printed using a UV-based ink. Then a white ink is overprinted to provide the proper opacity. Finally, a thin protective film is applied to prevent scratches and hold the glass together.

While these samples are displayed in stands, they can just as easily be mounted on a wall.

These Masterpix photos were displayed unframed. However they can also be put into conventional frames if desired.

Price for an 5″x7″ Masterpix with tabletop stand is $35. The images can be either portrait or landscape. Delivery time is about a week.

 
 
Currently you can order photos online, directly from Corning’s Masterpix website. They are available in these sizes: 5×7, 6×6, 8×10, 11×14, 16×16 and 16×24. The ordering process is simple, choose the size, upload your image and enter your delivery and payment information.

For details on these glass presentation frames, visit Corning’s Masterpix website for full details.

Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 


 
 

High Quality Desktop Printer

I’m an ardent believer that it’s better to get your photographs off of your hard drive and into print.

About ten years ago, we had a 13″ wide printer to handle some of our smaller photographs. However, after it died following a long and generous life, we chose not to replace it. Since then we’ve been using a variety of photofinishers to reproduce our photographs.

After strolling by the Epson booth and seeing some of their impressive photograph displays, I talked to one of their customer representatives and am now considering their new Surecolor P600.

The P600 is a replacement for their previous R3000 model. It connects to your computer setup via an Ethernet connection or via WiFi. You’ll need a desktop area of 24″x36″ for the printer.

The top loader automatically feeds 13″x19″ paper for borderless printing. There’s a front loader for feeding single sheets of specialty fine art papers up to 1.3mm thickness. For panoramic prints up to 10 feet long, the P600 accepts the included roll feeder.

The P600 uses nine high capacity ink cartridges including three types of black ink for smooth toned black and white photographs.

The many photographs on display at the Epson booth demonstrated excellent quality on a variety of papers including these panoramas. In the past, I’ve had positive experiences using many fine art papers from Epson’s wide selection.

 
 
I asked the Epson representative about my concern about clogged ink cartridges when the printer is sits unused for a short while and was told that the ink will remain usable for up to six months from installation.

The list price of the Epson Surecolor P600 is $795. For more information, see the Epson P600 webpage for details.

The P600 is now on my short list of equipment purchases. I’m anxious to print several panoramas that I’ve stored on my hard drive – again, the hard drive is not a good place to keep photographs.
 
 
Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 


 
 

Light Field Technology

I made it a point to visit all of the booths at PhotoPlus Expo looking for new and interesting products.

At the Lytro booth, I learned a new term: Light Field Technology. With this camera, the direction, color and brightness of the light rays are captured by a specialized sensor array. Afterwards, this information can be “processed” to refocus and change perspective.

The Lytro Illum is a new, second generation camera to capture light field photographs. Lytro refers to these images as “living pictures”.

The Illum is fitted with a 30-250mm zoom lens with f/2 constant aperture. It has a 4″ tiling LCD viewing screen and weighs just over 2 lbs.

The fast f/2 lens provides an 8X zoom range. Images are stored on an SD, SDXC or SDHC card.

The specialized CMOS sensor has ISO range from 80 to 3200.

The camera also has built-in WiFi for transferring images directly to a smart device.

You can preview the images on the LCD and immediately see these living pictures as the focus and perspective change.

The LCD is touch sensitive – you can touch the part of the image to refocus. A “Lytro” button displays an overlay on the screen that displays the depth of field of objects, indicating the range of refocus.

Use the included Lytro Desktop software to upload to Lytro’s web (no charge) or to Facebook. Viewers can post comments about your pictures on the Lytro Gallery. When you upload, the software creates an animated gif file that animates the refocusing and change of perspective capabilities.

To see this interesting light field technology, visit the Lytro Gallery where you can experiment with these images by moving your mouse over the area to be refocused. I think it’s an amazing technology.

The Illum is available now at a list price of $1599 includes battery and ND filters (since aperture is fixed at f/2).

Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 


 
 

PhotoPlus Expo 2014

18th November 2014

When October comes around, I usually journey back to the stomping grounds of my youth, New York City.

I’m always anxious to attend the PhotoPlus Expo at Jacob Javits Center.

This year it was held from October 30th through November 1st.



More than 21,000 professional and enthusiasts flocked to Javits to see this year’s expo.



on floor seminar from Sony

on floor seminar from Canon

PhotoPlus combines photo education classes and a large exposition. There are about 80 classes and seminars covering diverse topics such as techniques for posing, lighting, composition, movie making, sound reproduction, marketing and business practices.



on floor seminar from Nikon

on floor seminar from Wescott

The large exposition had 225 exhibitors including 60 making their first appearance at PhotoPlus.

I thoroughly enjoy walking the aisles and talking to the vendors and learning what’s new in photographic equipment and accessories.


 
 
This is one of my favorite shows for learning about new photographic equipment and accessories. I’m now preparing a series of articles that highlight some of the new products from the show. You’ll see them shortly.
 
 
Written by: Arnie Lee
 
 
 


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