Tag Archives: equipment

Nikon Equipment for Sale

this article will be removed after the sale

Ready. Set. Go.

I’ve gone mirrorless, so I thought it was a time to clean out one of my closets that is full of Canon cameras, lenses and accessories. And now I have another closet of Nikon gear that I’m doing the same.


Here is the list of Nikon stuff that’s for sale. All items are in excellent to very good condition. This list and availability will be updated until all items are sold. You can see the photos of the equipment below.


SOLD – Nikon D600 body $400 24MP full frame, shutter actuations 4562
SOLD – Nikon D800 body $700 36MP full frame, shutter actuations: 9620
SOLD – 14-24mm f/2.8G lens $800
SOLD – 16mm f/2.8 lens $500 fisheye
SOLD – 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 VR lens $250
SOLD – 28-70mm f/2.8D lens $350
SOLD – 50mm f/1.4D lens $200
SOLD – 70-200mm f/2.8G VR lens $700
SOLD – 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR lens $325
SOLD – 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6D VR lens $600
SOLD – 85mm f/1.8D lens $250
SOLD – 300mm f/4 lens $300
SOLD – SB-600 speedlite $100
SB-800 speedlite $150
SOLD – Altura speedlite $ 50 Model AP-N1001


All items are available for only for local (Grand Rapids, Michigan), cash only transactions.




If you’re interested in any of these items, please contact me:


     


    Note: I may not have the boxes and instruction manuals for each lens


    Nikon D600 body with 24MP full frame sensor only 4600 shutter activations, pop-up flash

    Nikon D800 body with 36MP full frame sensor 9600 shutter activations, pop-up flash


    70-200mm f/2.8G VR and 300mm f/4

    80-400mm f/4.5-5.6D VR & 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G VR


    14-24mm f/2.8G and 28-70mm f/2.8D

    85mm f/1.8D and 16mm f/2.8D fisheye


    24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G and 50mm f/1.4D

    SB-800, SB-600 speedlite and AP-N1001 speedlites

    A Learning Experience

    how Google helped me solve a problem

    As an avid outdoor-nature photographer, I’ve always believed in the saying: “you can never have too many mm’s between you and a distant subject”.

    Recently I decided to add more mm’s to my camera bag and purchased a Sony 200-600mm lens to accompany the Sony A7 III.

    My first opportunity to use the new lens was on a trip a few weeks ago to Florida.

    This is one of the first images that I snapped. As I closely reviewed it in the viewfinder I could tell that it was obviously out of focus.

    The first thing I did was to immediately check the lens setting to use autofocus. It was.

    I then checked the camera menu to see if it all settings were correct for autofocus.

    Next I took several more photos but no luck.

    They were all severely out of focus.

    Disappointed, I decided to set this lens aside for the reminder of my time in Florida.

    Upon returning from this trip I planned to send the lens back to the vendor for repair or exchange.

    However, before calling the vendor for a return authorization, I spent a few minutes googling “Sony 200-600mm autofocus problem”.

    To my surprise I found a post that was identical to my problem. When I purchased the lens, I also purchased a circular polarizing filter (huge 95mm) to help reduce glare. The individual who wrote the google post explained that his filter interfered with the lens’ autofocus mechanism. By removing the filter, his images were no longer out of focus.

    So I took the filter off my lens to see if this solution applied to my problem.

    BINGO. The autofocus mechanism worked perfectly and produced this image.

    I’m happy that Google helped me solve my problem.

    I’m disappointed that I wasn’t able to take advantage of the extra mm’s during my stay in Florida. And I’m reminded that I need to test out new equipment before I’m in the field. I’ll continue to search out for a filter which may not interfere with my camera’s autofocus. Perhaps a different brand has properties that enable the autofocus to perform correctly. We’ll see.

    Anyway, I’m ready for my next opportunity to get outdoors with this lens.

    Happy shooting!

    Sony A6000

    I’ve been a proponent of Sony’s NEX mirrorless cameras since they first appeared three years ago. The reason is simple. The NEX series produce images comparable in quality to conventional DSLRs, accept interchangeable lenses yet are very compact. They are substantially smaller and lighter than DSLRs.

    Sony’s newest model is the A6000. Although Sony has dropped the NEX moniker, the A6000 retains the same compact footprint as the earlier NEX6 and NEX7 models.

    A few days before our recent extended vacation, an A6000 arrived in the mail. I used it heavily on our extended family vacation. Instead of writing a wordy review, I put together a “photo review” that demonstrates the versatility of the A6000. If you’re on the hunt for a feature packed, technically advanced and affordable camera, you should look at the A6000.

    You’ll find this quick and dirty “review” on my blog over at Stay Focused. Please click here to go to my online magazine.

    Written by: Arnie Lee

    It’s Personal

    Camera Brands Are Like Religion

    Not a week goes by without someone asking me what brand of camera they should buy, a Canon or a Nikon.

    Most of the time they’re wanting to replace their good quality point-and shoot camera. They’re looking for more advanced equipment along the lines of a DSLR.

    Having owned or used literally dozens of cameras, especially in the past five years, I have a definitive answer which I’ll share with you shortly. But what I find interesting is that so many photo enthusiasts also have very definite answers to this question.

    Let me back up a bit and explain why I’m writing this.

    A Facebook friend wrote that he was looking for a new DLSR. “Should I buy a Canon or a Nikon?”, he posted. I replied “or a Sony?”. The point I was trying to make was that there are more choices than only Canon and Nikon.

    A few minutes later there were many more replies on his Facebook status: “Nikon”; “CanonCanonCanon”; “I shoot Nikon”; “I use a Nikon D90”; “Canon definitely”; “I have a Nikon 5000”; etc.

     

     

    It’s not surprising that a camera brand is a very personal choice. It is as though each photographer is pleading with my friend to heed only his or her suggestion. Isn’t proselytizing their brand like forcing a person’s religion onto another?

    Yet when I think about it I was doing the same. I was suggesting that a Sony NEX camera is similar to DSLR but without the weight and bulk. And since I am very fond of carrying lightweight equipment, I frequently use a Sony NEX camera.

    Of course I could have chosen a different way to respond to his initial post by asking a few qualifying questions: will he be taking lots of sports or action; are movies part of his photography repertoire; how much money does he have to spend.

    But frankly these qualifying questions don’t matter much.

    Here’s my answer to his question: it doesn’t matter if you choose Canon or Nikon. Both have equally capable cameras in the various price ranges. And Sony also has equally capable cameras. One could argue that Pentax and Olympus also offer quality models too.

    There’s too many slanted opinions for my friend to make his choice based on all of the Facebook replies. I hope my friend makes his choice based on how the equipment feels in his hands; getting the most features for the price; availability and affordability of additional lenses; past experience with previous purchases.

    What do you think? Any comments?

    Written by: Arnie Lee